About

This site is part of my project to translate the writings of Rash Behari Bose from old Japanese into English, making his collection of publications widely accessible to readers for the first time. Once the translations are complete, I will be publishing them formally in a series of books.

As I work on the translations, I will be making regular posts on this blog to keep my readers up to date with the process. I will write in the first person as though Rash Behari Bose himself is speaking directly to you, in the style of a series of journal entries. The goal of this is to give my readers a platform to familiarize, or reacquaint themselves with the life events, philosophy and achievements of Rash Behari Bose.

Please note that while these blog posts remain faithful to the contents of the actual books, they are not the complete, detailed and accurate translations that will appear in the finalized publication.

Copyright © 2017All written materials are the sole property of the owner.  No portion of the text may be reproduced or used in any manner without the express written permission of the author.

 

About Rash Behari Bose

Rash Behari Bose was a great revolutionary leader and an instrumental figure in the achievement of free India. He dedicated himself to the Indian independence movement from an early age and was engaged in pivotal revolutionary activities across India, including the Ghadar Mutiny of 1915. Shortly after this incident he fled to Japan, necessitated by a frenzied manhunt launched by the British authorities. He continued to tirelessly devote himself to the independence movement even from abroad, rallying Japanese support for the Indian struggle and eventually founding the Indian National Army in 1942.

His early years in Japan were spent in hiding under the protection of a number of Japanese personages, including the prominent politician Tōyama Mitsuru. He lived out the remainder of his life in Japan, marrying Toshiko Sōma with whom he had two children, and going on to become a naturalized Japanese citizen in 1923. Bose grew to be a well respected and valued member of Japanese society, and in 1943 the Emperor honoured him with the Order of the Rising Sun.

boseandwife

Despite his invaluable role in the independence of India, today his legacy has been all but forgotten. His name is often overshadowed by and overlapped with that of his successor, Subhas Chandra Bose (no familial relation). Further shrouding his selfless contributions in mystery is the fact that, although he wrote several publications detailing his life and the events surrounding the Indian independence effort, his books have remained largely unknown and unread. The reason for this was that he wrote in an old style of Japanese that is a challenge even for modern Japanese speakers to decipher, much less the rest of the public.

I hope you will all follow along with me on this journey as I translate the writings of Rash Behari Bose into English, and bring his words back to life.

For more details, please begin by clicking here to read my introductory post.

4 thoughts on “About

  1. Great effort. Continue your pursuit.
    my blogs trace ancient Indian history and philosophy in my own narrative with a bias of my own to leave my print on the cyberspace for posterity as I will soon be a septuagenarian

    Liked by 1 person

    • Bose of Japan says:

      Thank you for your kind words. I appreciate your support and interest. Indian history and philosophy have so many buried treasures that I hope to learn about as I continue on with this project. I look forward to exchanging ideas with you.

      Like

  2. Hi,

    I follow your twitter page, the work you do on bringing light to the forgotten Indian figure is invaluable. Keep up the good work. I really look forward to read the book of your translations.

    Like

    • Bose of Japan says:

      Thank you for your comment. I am very honored to read and spread the words of Rash Behari Bose. He absolutely was a great soul. The target for my publication is this August. Please stay tuned.

      Like

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